Summary

If simply hearing the term ‘qubit’ is enough to have your brain scrambling to remember any portion of high school physics, then you’re closer than you think to understanding the underlying quantum technology.

You have most likely heard of the power of quantum computing within the last few years, and the promises that it holds in terms of revolutionizing the computing power of the 21st century are astounding. As lofty as those goals are projected to be, they are seriously pursued by numerous companies trying to harness the technical, hardware, and software challenges that come with commercializing quantum technology. 

 

If simply hearing the term ‘qubit’ is enough to have your brain scrambling to remember any portion of high school physics, then you’re closer than you think to understanding the underlying quantum technology. Just as you would try to name-drop as much as you possibly could to try and define the term ‘qubit’ by listing all the possibilities of what it could be, a quantum computer does the same thing when it’s asked to sequence a genome or simulate the outcomes of the Super Bowl based on that year’s data.

 

 If it’s still not clear, listen to Dr. Shai Machnes, a Ph.D physicist from Tel Aviv University, explain it further. 

 

You wouldn’t be the only one paying closer attention to quantum technology either – in 2022, President Biden and former Prime Minister Naftali Bennett signed off on a joint statement called the Strategic High-Level Dialogue on Technology, which aims to expand joint research and development in quantum science. To the tune of $60 million, a consortium of Israeli firms, including Elbit, Quantum Machines, ColdQuanta, and other U.S./Israeli firms, have been tasked to build Israel’s first quantum computer. The U.S. has a consortium of its own, led by Intel, academia, and the National Labs network, aiming to build out an ecosystem in the Midwest, which is looking to capture the network effects of Biden’s CHIPS Act that will focus investment in the Rust Belt.

 

The applications to using quantum computing are endless. Take a look at some of the featured Israeli companies below to see how they’re utilizing the technology to build out commercial applications in telecommunications, genomics, software, and more.

 

 Quantum Source – Quantum Source Labs is focused on using its photonic technology to enable the scaling of quantum computers to millions of qubits. Quantum computing technology like this is highly sought after in the pharmaceutical industry, as it can fractionalize the time it takes to develop new drugs, and thus increase the rate it takes for companies to send new medicines to market. 

 

 Qedma Quantum Computing – Qedma Quantum Computing is aiming to develop an operating system for quantum computers by developing quantum-computer-based software solutions.

 

QuantLR – Quant LR provides a solution designed for organizations interested in communicating highly sensitive data between two points, as well as for telecommunication providers (5G in particular) seeking to provide ultimately secured communication lines for a significant competitive advantage. QuantLR’s is seeking to enable worldwide mass deployment of quantum technology in related applications like blockchain, telecommunications, or supply chain solutions.

 

Classiq – Classiq is the leading quantum software company, taking quantum software to a higher level. Built for organizations that want to jumpstart and accelerate their quantum computing programs, Classiq allows customers to create quantum circuits that were not possible to create in other ways.

 

Quantum Machines – Quantum Machines is the creator of a complete hardware and software solution for the control and operation of quantum computers. Using QUA, a standard universal language for quantum computing, QM allows researchers to program complex quantum programs that are tightly integrated with classical processing and real-time decision-making. The language addresses all of the requirements of an anticipated quantum computing software revolution.

 

About the Author: Aaditya Divekar, Trade Officer for DeepTech, Telecom, HLS & Aerospace, is a Bay Area local with an academic background in international business and foreign policy.