Indo Israel Agriculture Cooperation: 24 varieties of citrus fruits developed

2020-05-11T13:36:50+00:00May 29th, 2017|Agriculture|0 Comments

The ‘Made in India’ version of high quality Israeli oranges will soon hit the Indian market.

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Institute uses Israeli scientific techniques to produce disease-free plants

As many as 24 new varieties of oranges and citrus fruits are being developed at the Centre of Excellence for Citrus Fruits at Nanta near Kota in Rajasthan. The project, launched in 2014-15, has helped graft nearly 50,000 plants every year.

The prominent varieties of citrus fruits developed at the centre are Clementine, Michale Daisy, Kinnow, Nagpur Mandarin, Nagpur Seedless and Jaffa. Spread over 6.8 hectares, the state-of-the-art centre also supplies fruits for export. Principal Agriculture and Horticulture Secretary Neelkamal Darbari said the technology adopted at the centre, such as mulch, drip and ridge bed system for irrigation, was based on Israeli scientific inputs.

Irrigation management

“The centre has largely achieved its objective of producing disease-free and high-quality planting material,” she said. In addition to promotion of mechanisation in orchard operations, the centre aims at spreading awareness about post-harvest and value addition technology and developing irrigation management techniques.

Ms. Dabari said that the potential of post-harvest processing projects would be explored by investors at the Global Rajasthan Agritech Meet (GRAM) beginning in Kota on Wednesday. At the event, the centre is likely to draw attention to its services to the region’s citrus fruit industry.

The Agriculture Department is considering marketing the centre’s produce as “Raj Santara”. Since the Jhalawar district in Kota is the largest producer of oranges in the State, there was an immense scope for packaging and branding operations of locally sourced fruits, said Ms. Darbari.

The centre has a primary nursery for plant grafting, a second nursery for budding, a protected mother block for nurturing mother plants.

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